November 10, 2020 By Maurizio Lalo Off

The Amazing Costumes of Phantom of the Opera

With over 230 costumes, designer Maria Bjornson, who also designed the set, has created a musical theater. They tell some of the most passionate stories told on Broadway through his musicals. As for the wardrobe, the costumes of the Phantom of the Opera are amongst the most expensive Broadway musical productions to date, at $230,000. 

Style

The extravagant style of “The Phantom” is as iconic today as the production itself, and the Tony-winning design captures that.

Fleming, who joined the production in 1989, has been a formative voice in the room since the costume was released. Building new costumes for new performers and repairing piles of hand-sewn beads. Bjornson spent much of his career designing operas and ballets, and he died in 2002. It always comes a bit different, “Fleming says of the” costume “of the phantom:” We always do it differently. 

He was interested in developing the series, “says Fleming. He designed the phantom mask himself because he wanted to be more interesting. Bjornson believes in evolution: “If Mary were alive today, she would improve this show just because she’s a kind of person and just a kind person.

Bjornson

The costumes worn by the Phantom are all the work of Bjornson, with variations and evolution. The designs, fabrics, and more all create shine on stage, but they are also part of the design process. 

For Evita, I insisted on doing the whole show on half an inch model. I told Bjornson that we would design fifty costumes in one day and present the show to the producers in ten days. I assured him that I wouldn’t worry about designing all the costumes myself, but he assured me, “Don’t worry. 

Maria showed Andrew Cameron and the company, and the sets by her and Bjornson were minimalist, in keeping with the minimalist nature of the show, with only a few pieces of furniture and a small number of costumes.  

Staging 

One listener told me: “You won’t believe it, but it’s true: The Phantom is staged in a shiny black enamel box, revealing exquisite props.    

There is the staircase that represents the lobby of the Garnier; there is a lintel from the 19th century; and of course, there is the roof on which the Paris Opera is climbed. The Phantom’s underground hideout and the travelers who take him and Christine there are bees.    

Otherwise, it is a beautifully designed, hand-painted curtain from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, which comes from a family that Bjornson has settled in France. On set, the curtain is not brought to the floor by itself, but by hand, with the help of a local painter.

The costumes of the Phantom of the Opera are just a fraction of what made the show a standard. It remained an important show for more than 30! years for multiple reasons!

And here are the costumes of “Wicked”!